South Carolina farmers excited for 2021 growing season

Source: Fresh Plaza

After a difficult year, South Carolinians can look forward to the simple pleasures of juicy red strawberries, sweet watermelons, refreshing cucumbers, ripe peaches, fresh butter beans, vibrant basil and many other South Carolina crops. It’s spring, and specialty crop farmers across the state are growing and harvesting fresh food to feed their communities.

“Our farmers worked hard to sustain us through the pandemic, and in 2021, I hope South Carolinians will show them some love,” said Commissioner of Agriculture Hugh Weathers. “You can support local farmers by choosing Certified South Carolina foods at the grocery store and farmers market and seeking out Fresh on the Menu restaurants.”

“Everybody has a favorite preacher and mechanic, but they need to find their favorite farmer,” said Josh Johnson of Old Tyme Bean Co., an Elloree farmer and chair of the South Carolina Specialty Crop Growers Association.

“When you support your local agricultural community, you’re not only investing in the future but providing yourself with nutritious food,” said LauraKate McAllister, executive director of the South Carolina Specialty Crop Growers Association.

Here are some of the specialty crops South Carolina farmers will harvest in the coming months:

April: Arugula, Asparagus, Beets, Blueberries, Bok Choy, Cabbage, Carrots, Cilantro, Collards, Fennel, Kale, Kohlrabi, Leeks, Lettuces, Microgreens, Mushrooms, Mustard & Turnip Greens, Onions, Parsley, Peas (sugar/snap), Radishes, Rutabagas, Strawberries, Swiss Chard, Turnips

May: Arugula, Asparagus, Basil, Beans (Snap/Pole), Beets, Blueberries, Bok Choy, Broccoli, Cabbage, Carrots, Cauliflower, Cilantro, Collards, Cucumbers, Fennel, Green Garlic, Kale, Kohlrabi, Leeks, Lettuces, Microgreens, Mushrooms, Mustard & Turnip Greens, Onions, Parsley, Peas (sugar/snap), Potatoes, Radishes, Rutabagas, Strawberries, Summer Squash, Sweet Corn, Swiss Chard, Turnips, Zucchini

June: Basil, Beans (Snap/Pole), Blackberries, Blueberries, Bok Choy, Broccoli, Butter Beans, Cabbage, Cantaloupe, Carrots, Cilantro, Collards, Cucumbers, Edamame, Eggplant, Fennel, Garlic, Herbs, Kale, Kohlrabi, Microgreens, Mushrooms, Okra, Onions, Peaches, Peas (sugar/snap), Peppers, Plums, Radishes, Strawberries, Summer Squash, Sweet Corn, Swiss Chard, Tomatoes, Watermelon, Zucchini

For more information:
Eva Moore
South Carolina Department of Agriculture
Tel.: +1 803-734-2196
Email: emoore@scda.sc.gov

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